Sanger’s Racist Genocidal Plans and The Masque of the Red Death

Sanger’s Racist Genocidal Plans and The Masque of the Red Death.

Sanger’s Racist Genocidal Plans and The Masque of the Red Death.

Do you want to know what Margaret Sanger, the great “heroine” of Planned Parenthood, and abortion-advocates and committed elitiststhroughout the nation had to say about African American and lower-income populations?

Check it out:

We should hire three or four colored ministers, preferably with social-service backgrounds, and with engaging personalities. The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal. And we do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.

All of our problems are the result of overbreeding among the working class, and if morality is to mean anything at all to us, we must regard all the changes which tend toward the uplift and survival of the human race as moral.

Eugenics is … the most adequate and thorough avenue to the solution of racial, political and social problems.

I have no doubt that Sanger would have applauded yesterday’s article of full revelation at Salon, and the admission that “Sure, abortion ends a life, so what?” That writer echoes Sanger: some lives are worth more than others. She also writes that a life in utero is a life “worth sacrificing.”

via Sanger’s Racist Genocidal Plans and The Masque of the Red Death.

Sunday Snippets–A Catholic Carnival

RAnn of This That and the Other Thing hosts Sunday Snippets–A Catholic Carnival, a group of Catholic bloggers who gather weekly to share posts of interest to Catholic bloggers. Join the fun by visiting This That and the Other Thing and creating your own link as RAnn directs.

This week I have one poem and an article I wrote for my nursing school alumni magazine as a response to a piece they printed praising Margaret Sanger and a Mt. Sinai nurse who worked with her.

Vigilance

Then and Now – The Dilemma and the Dialog